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Hammering Copper Goods

Many customers frequently ask if the distinctive hammer patterns on our work are produced by a machine, because they look too perfect!  

Have you ever heard the story of Giotto’s red circle?  In brief: Giotto was the first Italian Renaissance master, commissioned to paint the basilica of Saint Francis after he drew, freehand, a perfect red circle for the Pope as proof of his skill.  Practice makes the master.  

This mastery shows in all of our pieces, the perfect organic nature of each hammer blow falling in line with the next, round and round.  Here are a few items that really show the skill of our master Artesans hammering copper.

Circling the circles on our round platters

Squaring the circles as you see in our square platters

Spiraling the rectangles of our Charolita Trays

And running the rectangular lines down our Rectangle platters

Hammering is an integral part of the production process, serving to give final form, work harden the material, and beat a shine into the surface, telescoped from the hammer’s highly polished face, creating a more durable, long-lasting and wear friendly piece.

The pattern is placed by a hammer held in the hand.  With practice and focus, the hammer is as steady and true as our heartbeat. Every hammered piece can be read much like handwriting, unique to each author, their tool and temperament reflected in the residual pattern of their blows.

Hammered Copper by Sertodo Copper creates a superior finished product because:

  • The naturally soft metal is work hardened by the impact which creates a much more durable piece.
  • Our highly polished hammerd actually beat a polished shine into the metal.
  • The textured surface wears extremely well with time.
  • We have already beaten it thoroughly, everything else that happens is just character!

We are master craftsmen. Despite our modern age of mass production and digital reality, the power and creativity of our own human hands (and yours as well!) should not be forgotten or underestimated.

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